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Required Records and Health Forms

Submitting Your Records

All admitted students are required to submit proof of required immunizations and screenings to the Student Health Center by August 1 for the fall semester, January 3 for the spring semester, and May 1 for the summer semester.  Updated information may be required from current students to keep their records up to date while they are on campus.  

Print Required Health Forms

Immunization Records

Please complete the immunization section of the Required Health Forms and obtain your physician's signature verifying the dates.  You may also have your physician send your records to us directly by faxing to 314-977-7165.

Tuberculosis Screening

Please complete the Tuberculosis Screening Questionnaire found in the Required Health Forms.  It will indicate if further skin testing is also necessary to complete the screening.  

Meningitis Requirement for Students Living on Campus

If you will be living on campus, you must complete the meningococcal vaccination requirement either by providing documentation of vaccination or by completing the Meningococcal Vaccine Waiver section of the Required Health Forms indicating that you have reviewed the information and have made the decision not to have the vaccination.

It is important to note there are two types of meningococcal vaccine, meningococcal ACWY vaccine (MenACWY) which includes Menactra and Menveo, and serogroup B meningococcal vaccine (MenB) which includes Bexsero and Trumenba.  The CDC recommends MenACWY vaccine for first-year college students living in residence halls.  This is the vaccine we require.  We offer MenACWY and MenB vaccines at Student Health, and recommend speaking with your physician about both vaccines before coming to SLU.  

Additional Information about Meningitis

Deadlines for Form Submission

  • Fall enrollment: Aug. 1
  • Spring enrollment: Jan. 3
  • Summer enrollment: May 1

If we receive a partial immunization record or one of the required immunizations is outdated, we will send you notification to your SLU email address.

A registration hold will be placed if we do not receive your complete immunization records showing you are up to date on all requirements.  The hold will be released once we have documentation that you have completed the requirement. 

Where to Return Your Forms

Forms should be returned to Saint Louis University's Student Health Center:

Student Health Center
3518 Laclede Ave.
Marchetti Tower East
St. Louis, MO 63103
Fax: 314-977-7165

  • Please ensure that all supporting parts of the forms are included.
  • Incoming students can also submit health forms at SLU101 orientation.
  • You are encouraged to retain copies and documentation of your submission for your records. 

Immunization and Screening Information

Tetanus, Diphtheria, Pertussis

• DT: pediatric (<age 7 years) preparation of diphtheria and tetanus toxoids.

• DTaP: pediatric (<age 7 years) preparation of diphtheria, tetanus toxoids, and acellular pertussis.

• DTP (also known as DTwP): pediatric (<age 7 years) preparation of diphtheria, tetanus toxoids, and whole cell pertussis (no longer available

in the U.S.).

• Td: 7 years and older preparation of tetanus toxoid and reduced diphtheria toxoid.

• Tdap: adolescent and older preparation of tetanus toxoid, reduced diphtheria toxoid, and acellular pertussis.

Vaccination Schedule

Primary series in childhood (4 doses: DT, DTaP, DTP, or Td)

Booster doses: For adolescents 11–18 and adults 19–64: single dose of Tdap. Tdap can be administered regardless of interval since the last tetanus or diphtheria toxoid-containing vaccine.

Routine booster dose intervals: Adults should receive Td boosters at 10 year intervals, beginning 10 years after receiving Tdap.

Tetanus prophylaxis in wound management: For all age groups, patients who require a tetanus toxoid containing vaccine as part of wound management should receive Tdap instead of Td if they have not previously received Tdap. If Tdap is not available or was administered previously, Td should be administered.

Major Indications

All college students. One dose of Tdap for all individuals ages 11–64 regardless of interval since last Td booster.

Contraindications and Precautions
  • History of hypersensitivity or serious adverse reaction to any of the components in the vaccine.
  • There is a theoretical risk of increased rates of local or systemic reactions when two diphtheria toxoid -containing vaccines are administered within a short interval (i.e., on different days). Efforts should be made to administer Tdap and tetravalent meningococcal conjugate (MCV4) vaccines simultaneously if both are indicated. If simultaneous vaccination is not feasible, Tdap and MCV4 vaccines (which contain diphtheria toxoid) can be administered in any sequence.

More Information About the Tdap Vaccine from the CDC

Measles, Mumps, Rubella
Vaccination Schedule

Two doses of MMR at least 28 days apart after 12 months of age.

Major Indications
  • All college students born after 1956 without lab evidence of disease.
  • All health care professional students without other evidence of immunity should receive two doses of MMR.
  • Those born before 1957 without other evidence of immunity should receive one dose if not in an outbreak setting and two doses if in an outbreak.
Contraindications and Precautions
  • Pregnancy, history of hyper-sensitivity or anaphylaxis to any of the components in the vaccine.
  • Receipt of blood products and moderate or severe acute infections. Guidelines exist for vaccination of persons with altered immunocompetence.

More Information About the MMR Vaccine from the CDC

Varicella
Vaccination Schedule
  • Two doses of varicella-containing vaccine at least 12 weeks apart if vaccinated between 1 and 12 years of age and at least
  • 4 weeks apart if vaccinated at age 13 years or older.
Major Indications
  •  All college students without other evidence of immunity (e.g., born in the U.S. before 1980, a history of disease, two prior doses of varicella vaccine, or a positive antibody).
  • All health care professional students with only one documented dose of vaccine or with a negative antibody titer should receive a total of two doses of vaccine.
Contraindications and Precautions

Pregnancy, history of hyper-sensitivity or anaphylaxis to any of the components in the vaccine, and severe illness. Guidelines exist for vaccination of persons with altered immunocompetence.

More Information About the Varicella Vaccine from the CDC

Meningitis Quadrivalent (A, C, Y, W-135)
  • Conjugate (Preferred)
  • Polysaccharide (Acceptable alternative if conjugate not available)
Vaccination Schedule
  • Initial dose of conjugate vaccine: 11-12 yrs of age
  • Booster dose: 16 yrs of age
  • If initial dose given age 13-15 yrs: booster dose at 16-18 yrs of age
  • If initial dose given age ≥16 yrs, no booster dose required

Persons with persistent complement component deficiencies or asplenia should receive a 2-dose primary series administered 2 months apart and then receive a booster dose every 5 years. Adolescents aged 11 through 18 years with HIV infection should be routinely vaccinated with a 2-dose primary series. Other persons with HIV who are vaccinated should receive a 2-dose primary series administered 2 months apart. All other persons at increased risk for meningococcal disease (e.g., microbiologists or travelers to an epidemic or highly endemic country) should receive a single primary dose.

For colleges and university with meningococcal vaccine policies as a requirement of enrollment or on-campus living: students 21 years of age and younger should have documentation of a dose of conjugate vaccine at ≥16 years of age. The booster dose can be administered any time after the 16th birthday. The minimum interval between doses of meningococcal conjugate vaccine is 8 weeks.

Routine vaccination of healthy persons who are not at increased risk for exposure is not recommended after age 21 years.

Major Indications

Adolescents 11-18 years of age and other populations at increased risk, including college students living in residence halls/similar housing, etc., persons with persistent complement deficiencies or asplenia, laboratory personnel with exposure to aerosolized meningococci, and travelers to hyperendemic or endemic areas of the world. Non-freshmen college students may choose to be vaccinated to reduce their risk of meningococcal disease. *

Contraindications and Precautions
  • History of hypersensitivity or serious adverse reaction to any of the components in the vaccine.
  • Avoid vaccinating persons who are known to have experienced Guillain-Barre (GBS) syndrome.

There is a theoretical risk of increased rates of local or systemic reactions when two diphtheria toxoid -containing vaccines are administered within a short interval (i.e., on different days). Efforts should be made to administer Tdap and tetravalent meningococcal conjugate (MCV4) vaccines simultaneously if both are indicated. If simultaneous vaccination is not feasible, Tdap and MCV4 vaccines (which contain diphtheria toxoid) can be administered in any sequence.

*Colleges may target all matriculating freshmen if targeting those in residence halls/similar housing is not feasible.

More Information About the MenACWY Vaccine from the CDC

Serogroup B Meningococcal
  • MenB-4C (Bexsero®, 2 dose series)
  • MenB-FHbp (Trumenba®, 2 or 3 dose series)
Vaccination Schedule
  • For MenB-4C: 0–2 months (Category A or B below)
  • For MenB-FHbp: 0–2–6 months (Category A below), or 0–6 months (Category B below)
Major Indications

Category A: Should be administered to persons at increased risk due to:

  • Outbreaks of serogroup B meningococcal disease
  • Persistent complement component deficiencies
  • Treatment with eculizumab for hemolytic uremic syndrome or paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria
  • Anatomic or functional asplenia including sickle cell disease
  • Laboratory workers routinely exposed to isolates of N. meningitis

[Category A: Recommendations made for all persons in age or risk-factor group.]

Category B: May be administered to:

  • Adolescents and young adults age 16–23 for short term protection (preferred age 16–18)
  • Serogroup B vaccines may be administered with Men ACWY but at different anatomic site, if possible.

[Category B: Recommendations are made through consultation and discussion between the individual and their health care provider.

Contraindications and Precautions
  • Defer in pregnant or lactating females unless at increased risk.
  • History of hypersensitivity to any of the components of the vaccine.
  • MenB-4 (Bexsero®): use with caution if hypersensitive to latex.
  • The two vaccines are not interchangeable, so the same product must be used for all doses.

More Information About the Serogroup B Meningococcal Vaccine from the CDC

Tuberculosis

 Tuberculosis screening is required for all students. Tuberculosis testing is mandated for:

  • International students born in a country with a high incidence of tuberculosis.
  •  Students with a history of living or traveling for more than two months in areas with a high incidence of tuberculosis disease.
  • Students with signs or symptoms of active tuberculosis, a positive tuberculosis skin test or close contacts with a person known to have active tuberculosis.
  • Students who have worked in nursing homes, hospitals, or other residential institutions.

More Information About the Tuberculin Test from the CDC

Hepatitis A
Vaccination Schedule 

Given as a series of 2 doses (given at 0, 6–12 mo.) for age 12 months or greater. *

Major Indications

Recommended for routine use in all adolescents through the age of 18 and in particular for adolescent and adult high-risk groups (i.e., persons traveling to countries where hepatitis A is moderately or highly endemic, men who have sex with men, users of injectable and non-injectable drugs, persons who have clotting-factor disorders, persons working with nonhuman primates, and persons with chronic liver disease).

Contraindications and Precautions

History of hypersensitivity to any of the components of the vaccine.

*Combined hepatitis A and B vaccines may be given as a series of 3 doses (given at 0, 1-2, and 6-12 mo.) for 18 years of age and older.

More Information About the Hepatitis A Vaccine from the CDC

Hepatitis B
Vaccination Schedule

Given as a series of 3 age appropriate doses (given at 0, 1–2 mo., and 6–12 mo.) at any age. Adolescents ages 11–15 years can be given 2 adult doses (given at 0 and 4-6 mo.) *

Major Indications

All college students. In particular, students enrolled in health care professional programs should receive Hepatitis B vaccination.

Contraindications and Precautions

History of hypersensitivity to any of the components of the vaccine.

*Combined hepatitis A and B vaccines may be given as a series of 3 doses (given at 0, 1-2, and 6-12 mo.) for 18 years of age and older.

More Information About the Hepatitis B Vaccine from the CDC

Polio
  •  Inactivated (IPV)
  • Oral poliovirus (OPV no longer available in U.S.)
Vaccination Schedule

Primary series in childhood with IPV alone, OPV alone, or IPV/OPV sequentially; IPV booster only if needed for travel after age 18 years.

Major Indications

IPV for certain international travelers to areas or countries where polio is epidemic or endemic.

Contraindications and Precautions

History of hypersensitivity to any of the components of the vaccine.

More Information About the Polio Vaccine from the CDC

Please note that the following programs have additional immunization requirements:

  • Nursing
  • Physical Therapy
  • Occupational Therapy
  • Medical School
  • Physician Assistant

Applicability, documentation and enforcement

1. This policy applies to all domestic and international students entering the University for the first time, unless medical or religious exemptions pertain. Students in the School of Professional Studies must only comply with the requirement related to tuberculin testing.

2. Submission of this record, by the date specified, is mandatory. Failure to comply will result in registration being canceled and/or restricted.

3. The university also reserves the right to deny access to campus facilities, including residence halls, if documentation of compliance has not been provided. Further, in accordance with public health recommendations, non-immune students may be excluded from the university campus in the event of a measles, rubella, mumps or diphtheria outbreak or other public health recommendation.

Additional information:

  • Some students may be exempt from one or more of these requirements due to age, religion or medical contraindication. Please call us at (314) 977-2323 with any questions about these requirements.
  • We also highly recommend the influenza vaccine
  • All travel vaccines can be ordered by our physician after a travel physical (i.e. yellow fever, typhoid, Japanese encephalitis, etc.)
  • Distance learners who will not be taking any portion of their classes on campus do not have to complete immunization requirements.

Protected Health Information

Your privacy is of utmost importance. If you require that we send your medical records or disclose your medical information, please complete and return the Authorization to Release Patient Information. If you would like to release information from another provider to us, please complete and submit the Authorization to Obtain Patient Information.